Dance

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The Ghost Dance

Published November 15, 2022 by tindertender

On this day, November 12th, 1890, an indigenous movement giving hope to the peoples in their loss and grief, was met with fear and violent suppression by the US government and it’s armed forces.

The Ghost Dance is, and was, a spiritual movement that came about in the late 1880s when conditions were in grave despair on Indian reservations with sickness, starvation and death ever present, Native Americans needed something to give them hope.

  • the Ghost Dance song:
    “The whole world is coming,
    A nation is coming, a nation is coming,
    The eagle has brought the message to the tribe, The father says so, the father says so.
    Over the whole earth they are coming,
    The buffalo are coming, the buffalo are coming, The crow has brought the message to the tribe, The father says so, the father says so.”
    “When the Sun died, I went up to Heaven and saw God [Creator] and all the people who had died a long time ago. God [Creator] told me to come back and tell my people they must be good and love one another, and not fight, or steal or lie. He gave me this dance to give to my people.”

    ~ Wovoka. HISTORIC AUDIO RECORDING, click on link below to hear. https://archive.org/embed/CollectedWorksOfJamesMooney

The Ghost Dance was an answer to the subjugation of Native Americans by the U.S. government. It was an attempt to revitalize traditional culture and to find a way to face increasing poverty, hunger, and disease, all representing the reservation life of the Native Americans in the late nineteenth century.
The Ghost Dance originated among the Paiute Indians around 1870. However, the tide of the movement came in 1889 with a Paiute shaman Wovoka (Jack Wilson). Wovoka had a vision during a sun eclipse in 1889.

While many European Americans were alarmed by the Ghost Dance and saw it as a militant and warlike movement, it was quite the opposite — an emergence of a peaceful resistance movement based on Indian beliefs. It was also a movement of desperation, as existing treaties had been violated and Indians in the West were forced onto reservations. For the Plains Indians, this was a period of starvation as the buffalo were slaughtered, destroying their way of life and main source of food. From an Indian point of view, Europeans were not only destroying the way of life of Indian peoples, but destroying the natural resources of the plains to an extent that would make it impossible for anyone to live there. European Americans often saw the Ghost Dance as irrational. From an Indian point of view, what was being done to them and their way of life was irrational.

James Mooney wrote a book about the Ghost Dance, hoping it would help to counter newspaper articles about it that were inaccurate and promoted prejudice toward the Indians. His research was first published as part of a report in 1890, then enlarged as a book in 1896. The press encouraged popular belief that the dance was dangerous and possibly a prelude to an Indian uprising. Mooney emphatically explained that it was peaceful. In his introduction he describes several fieldwork trips between 1890-1894 that “occupied twenty-two months, involving nearly 32,000 miles of travel, and more or less time spent with about twenty tribes.” As a participant/observer he sang and danced with the Arapaho and Cheyenne, consulted with participants in the new religion, and also took photographs. One reason for the excitement about the Ghost Dance among ethnographers at that time was that the researchers of American Indians were seeing the emergence of a new religion developing in a surprisingly short time and crossing culture and language barriers. This was an extremely rare event. The new movement spread throughout the Native camps in the West, giving Native people much needed hope.

White settlers reacted differently to the “new religion”. Some traveled to the reservations to observe the dancing, others feared the possibility of an Indian uprising. The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) eventually banned the Ghost Dance, because the government believed it was a precursor to renewed Native American militancy and violent rebellion. One of the goals of the agency was to convert the Natives to Christianity. The agency did not recognize the Ghost Dance, misunderstanding and ignorance were part of the BIA decision.

Wovoka’s message clearly promoted pacifism. However, spreading rumors of Indian treachery ignited fear and panic with non natives. On November 12th, 1890, president Benjamin Harrison ordered the military to take control over Lakota Sioux reservation in South Dakota.

On December 29, 1890, 300 Lakota men, women and children were killed in an event that came to be known as the Massacre of Wounded Knee. What started as a peaceful movement in 1889, was brutally ended a year later by the U.S. military.

The Waves We Give

Published September 19, 2022 by tindertender

Be like water, my friend
You shall find a way around, or through it
When nothing within us stays rigid
We decide the shape we’re in

Empty your mind
Be shapeless, formless, like water
It can flow or it can crash

And we design the waves we give

We decide, we design
We decide the shape we’re in
And the waves we give
We decide, we design
We decide the shape we’re in
And the waves we give

Be like water, my friend
You shall find a way around, or through it
When nothing within us stays rigid
We decide the shape we’re in

Empty your mind
Be shapeless, formless, like water
It can flow or it can crash

Be like water, my friend
You shall find a way around, or through it
When nothing within us stays rigid
We decide the shape we’re in
And the waves we give

We can flow or we can crash

Source: Musixmatch

Songwriters: Alexandra Elizabeth Sarton / Glen Valencia Jr

The Waves We Give lyrics © Onerpm Songs

History Repeats

Published July 4, 2022 by tindertender

A vengeful god who gains power through the use of fear, chooses to destroy those around him.

He chooses to keep them weakened, or bound to him in some way, in order to eliminate the potential of challenge.

Do you know what happens to a tree if it has the power to destroy those around it?

Do you know what happens if it chooses to make them weak, in order to be subservient?

It becomes diseased, it withers and becomes no more … well, not really. It becomes the fertile soil the next thing grows in.

In forestry, it is true that the neighbors can be genetically altered to resist disease, and I’m certain this has been considered.

The cycle continues.

Those attempting to force a “lesson” on others are getting schooled, or are about to.

Turn the wheel, let it spin, where it stops it ends, where it stops it begins.

I believe these are the real gamblers of the Multiverse … not some sleeper human addicted to paper money and chips.

What is is, it is.

What it will be, it will be.

One of the first lessons many of us were taught was how not to be a ‘sore loser’.

If the training needs to be leaned upon, let us do it in a good way.

Our Game

Published May 13, 2022 by tindertender

A story told of long ago
Before they knew they were powerful
Materials ruled the world
They sang sad songs, of how they suffered
With narrow eyes, and twice sold lies
A victim’s view, from inside a cube
My Love

Then all at once, but one by one
They heard the call, a simple song saying
“When would you like to leave it all behind?
You can quit all your sorrow, lose track of time
And jump in, surrender, wash it all away
Jump in, remember
This is our game
My Love”

And now the tables have turned, and the scales evened
And the illusions are breaking at the seams
And the patterns, and problems, and prisons of the past
Will be pushed under the table, never meant to Last
And we grow in numbers, day by day
A familiar smile up, upon your face
My Love

Then all at once, but one by one
They heard the call, a simple song
Saying, “When would you like to leave it all behind?
You can quit all your sorrow, lose track of time
And jump in, surrender”

Jump in, surrender, wash it all away
Jump in, remember
This is our game
My Love

Source: Musixmatch

Songwriters: Pepper Proud / Masaru Higasa Swanson

Do All Things With Love

Published May 8, 2022 by tindertender

The more you give the more you receive, and I don’t mean in the material realm. Spiritually, you expand.

Giving can look like dancing in the living room, amping up your energy and blasting it out into the world, with love.

It can be in prayer, supporting our higher Selves and Relatives, all who are working on behalf of the sacred.

It can be many things, done with heart and pure living intention.

This is what we do as antennae of the world, as the bridge linking upper and lower realms.

The more you give, the more you receive.

The more you give and receive, the greater the light you blast between these linked worlds.

The more light you receive from the upper and blast into the lower, the quicker change for the better is affected.

Yes. You are that powerful.

All things with Love, and a calm, steady emotional body.

Stay out of anger, shame and fear.

This energy feeds the oppressor.

Stay hydrated. Well hydrated. Be a faucet, and release everything that is not of love energy. Allow the water to flush every cell.

Be grateful to the water, do not complain.

Bless it as it blesses you.

A Hopi Elder Speaks

Published March 14, 2022 by tindertender

“You have been telling the people that this is the Eleventh Hour, now you must go back and tell the people that this is the Hour. And there are things to be considered . . .

Where are you living?

What are you doing?

What are your relationships?

Are you in right relation?

Where is your water?

Know your garden.

It is time to speak your Truth.

Create your community.

Be good to each other.

And do not look outside yourself for the leader.”

Then he clasped his hands together, smiled, and said, “This could be a good time!”

“There is a river flowing now very fast. It is so great and swift that there are those who will be afraid. They will try to hold on to the shore. They will feel they are torn apart and will suffer greatly.

“Know the river has its destination. The elders say we must let go of the shore, push off into the middle of the river, keep our eyes open, and our heads above water. And I say, see who is in there with you and celebrate. At this time in history, we are to take nothing personally, Least of all ourselves. For the moment that we do, our spiritual growth and journey comes to a halt.

“The time for the lone wolf is over. Gather yourselves! Banish the word struggle from you attitude and your vocabulary. All that we do now must be done in a sacred manner and in celebration.

“We are the ones we’ve been waiting for.”

— attributed to an unnamed Hopi elder

Hopi Nation

Oraibi, Arizona

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