Water

All posts tagged Water

Get It Off The Shelf !!!!

Published June 24, 2020 by tindertender

Bayer is paying $10.5 billion for the damages and deaths caused by a chemical they still represent to the government regulators as “Harmless”. Millions of pounds is being sprayed into the drinking water across the country today.

Roundup is being applied in parks, schools and front yards everywhere. Roundup is sprayed on agriculture and is found in our foods. Glyphosate must be outright banned.

Bayer AG is set to announce on Wednesday it struck a roughly $10.5 billion deal to settle tens of thousands of lawsuits with U.S. plaintiffs alleging the company’s Roundup herbicide causes cancer, a milestone in the German company’s legal battle that has been weighing down its share price for nearly two years, according to a person familiar with the deal.

https://www.wsj.com/articles/bayer-reaches-10-5-billion-settlement-over-weedkiller-roundup-11593017309?fbclid=IwAR1XZFNUrBBi7NWo3YAZM6NAtTwMJTvA2j9KCcJVFZsWwdkZGk4PptTjigM

Why is this still being allowed to sell?

This is outright planetary poisoning!

Make it ILLEGAL NOW.

It’s A Wrap

Published June 9, 2020 by tindertender

Imagine perfect foam splattering off a roiling ocean wave.

Its churning presence reminds us not to drink, or even breathe too deeply while present.

Viruses, I suppose, are similar. Breath shallow, cover your mouth, don’t get too close.

Is Nature telling us to take a few steps back?

Photo: https://unsplash.com/@powwpic

Or are scientists and others just scamming the plot that’s been planned for many, many years?

Joy Riding on a Sunny Afternoon

Published May 7, 2020 by tindertender

Left the house to experience the wind once more, blowing everything in the car around, windows down.

I stopped at a little shack selling clam chowder and fish and chips. Purchased and ate a piece of fish and a few chips.

A fellow came by as I sat there. He walked to the man at the window, and then walked away, empty handed. He looked real down. I asked him if he was hungry. He said yes, so I gave him the remaining three pieces of fish with the chips. He looked very emotional and I watched as he walked to his room at the hotel nearby. I felt for him in that moment and hope he finds what he needs.

If we have extra, let us remember to share. Share with whoever happens to be there at the time, for this is our opportunity to do so. Regardless of appearance … share.

I drove along, for miles and miles, I came upon a pretty remote area, not a soul around.

I rested there awhile, munching on sunflower seeds. Here is a video of the place.

As I sat there, I thought about tools needed to tend garden, and supplies needed to preserve foods. I thought about a modest cabin with basic necessities. The simpler the better.

I wandered around taking pictures and then set up my chair in the sun.

Heading back toward town, I stopped to take more pictures.

Beautiful bull
Pony, goats and horse
A barn in disrepair
Cube, but it’s not. It’s actually flat, and an optical illusion.

That is the end of the joy ride, but much happened I did not capture.

I stopped along a rural road and stand. Bought fresh eggs, apples, red potatoes, cauliflower and honey.

I drove into a the nearest rural town and then out again, stopping at a roadside building selling more fruits and vegis. Bought watermelon, asparagus, a mango, and avocados.

It felt good to support the farmers, who are having difficulty getting their supplies to the city. I’m going to look for them every time I go for a nice drive and purchase from them if I am able.

My appreciation is growing during these days of separation from each other. For nature, for the work that men and women do, in all of the various ways work is done, for the benefit of the whole.

I’ve been dwelling on the inner stuff a lot. I understand better now, that I have been projecting and blaming for my inner pains. (And to think I thought I was done with all that inner work!) And so I have begun asking for help to relieve the pain so I do not project it into the world … praying, if you will. Whatever that looks like. Pretty sure it isn’t a wrong way, in private, with nature.

Nature helps me in many ways.

Connecting to benevolence seems to be easier here.

Where the trees cleanse and recycle my breath. Where the waters churn and provide oxygen to the things within, and those outside of itself. This delicate balance, consistently shared, constantly offered to life.

Home now, having eaten my corn and red potatoes, I relax and think on the day. I consider topping off the experience with a nice magnesium bath in some scented water … and so I’m off, until next time.

Below picture is not me …

Photo: https://unsplash.com/@brucemars

Filthy Dirty South

Published May 1, 2020 by tindertender

So there’s oil comin’ out your mouth,
And you can’t shut it off you can’t close it down,
And yes I love my filthy dirt south,
So we are all lead like lambs to the slaughter

While the big corporations fuck up our water
Please don’t sit back sit back in awe
All in line pullin’ our last straw
Eh eh eh eeee, oh oh oh ooooooh a a a e eeee, o o o oooooh yeeaaa

And if you muddy my water i’ll come after you
And if you muddy my water then i’ll come after you,
And if you muddy my water I’ll come after you
And if you muddy my water I’ll come after you

So there’s oil comin’ out your mouth,
And you can’t shut it off you can’t close it down,
Yes I love my filthy dirty south, well yea
So we are all lead like lambs to the slaughter

While the big corporations fuck up our water
Please don’t sit back sit back in awe
(Well yea) all in line pullin’ our last straw
Eh eh eh eeee, oh oh oh ooooooh a a a e eeee, o o o oooooh y
eeaaa

Natural Beauty

Published April 29, 2020 by tindertender

The road called me for a joyride today. I got lost, and more lost, and lost deeper yet. Turn left, turn right, keep going for miles and miles. Finally having to ask a lady walking her dog how to get back to town. I crossed county lines repeatedly as I travelled the country roads.

I parked and walked for a very long time along an overgrown road/trail. Coming to this place, I see a log and a rock. They appear to be staring at me in the form of a turtle or tortoise. I reach into my purse for my pocket guide “Animal Speak” and I search for the meaning of this vision.

Turtle: (promise) Take your time in your pursuits.Trust in Mother Earth. You will have what you need.

Tortoise: (move through pressure) Pressures are easing and movement is slow but steady. Things will happen in the time and manner best for you. Focus on essentials.

The side of this rural road was peppered with beautiful flowers, small, yet many.

I took several videos and pieced them together. It is slightly long, but my oh my, the scenery!

I hope you enjoyed the journey with me. It brings such joy to be present with creation. I hope you will gain opportunity to commune with the natural world, and receive its blessings.

March 12, 2020 – FLINT, MI

Published March 15, 2020 by tindertender

More than $87 million in federal funds appropriated for fixing Flint’s infrastructure after the city’s water crisis hasn’t been collected because there have been so few reimbursement requests from the city, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency says.

A top EPA official advised Mayor Sheldon Neeley and Liesl Eichler Clark, director of the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy, of the untouched funds in a Feb. 27 letter. The letter urged the city to “advance the schedule of remaining projects in order to complete work during the project period of the grant which ends Dec. 31, 2021.”

The EPA letter from Acting Water Division Director Thomas R. Short Jr. comes three years after the agency awarded $100 million in supplemental Drinking Water State Revolving Funds to the state to address water infrastructure in Flint.

https://www.mlive.com/news/flint/2020/03/epa-says-87-million-banked-for-flint-water-crisis-still-hasnt-been-spent.html

#Flint #News #Government #Politics

The FDA Knew the Bottled Water Was Contaminated. The Public Didn’t

Published February 12, 2020 by tindertender

FDA inspectors have found some companies failed quality standards for bottled water, but the agency didn’t take significant action.

The government’s May 2018 report on Sweet Springs Valley Water Company, a bottled water manufacturer in West Virginia, was alarming. An inspector from the Food and Drug Administration, during a review of Sweet Springs’ test records, found that several months earlier the company had bottled and distributed water from a source contaminated with E. coli, a potentially deadly bacteria.

The inspector asked Sweet Springs’ manager, Mable Cox, whether she had considered recalling the bottled water, the report says. Cox had not. “She also stated the water had probably been consumed by this point, but she would conduct a recall” to alert people who might still have the water at home “if the FDA wanted her to.” That didn’t happen, either.

In other words, contaminated bottled water can still reach unwitting consumers, even if the FDA knows about the problem.

FDA inspections of bottled water facilities, though, declined by 33 percent between 2008 and 2018, according to data provided by the agency, and several years can pass between visits—meaning, as with Sweet Springs, the FDA might not become aware of contamination until long after it happened. Even when tests show contamination, in most cases manufacturers don’t have to stop bottling or alert the public—for instance, by issuing a press release.

“Companies should not be selling contaminated bottled water, so whenever their own testing finds a violation, they should recall that water,” says Michael Hansen, Ph.D., a senior staff scientist at CR. “If they fail to do so voluntarily, the FDA should require them to.”

Standards for Tap Water Differ

Unlike bottled water, municipal water systems must notify their customers of test results showing contamination that could pose an immediate health risk, according to the Environmental Protection Agency, which regulates tap water. And the public must be alerted, such as through the media or by mail, when contamination is found in their tap supply. For the most serious violations, like potential waterborne diseases, municipal systems must notify the public within 24 hours; with other contamination issues, they have up to 30 days.

The EPA routinely cites tap water suppliers for not meeting the requirements: More than 3,000 community water systems, servicing 2.9 percent of the U.S. population, violated the Public Notification Rule during the most recent quarter for which EPA data is available. But tap water suppliers at least have a legal requirement to quickly inform the public “whenever this is an acute health risk,” Olson said. “It appears for bottled water that type of notification is not being done. That’s really worrisome.”

One of the pitfalls of the FDA’s policing policy is that it relies on bottlers to diligently record their test results and to act quickly when contamination is found—but beyond the failure to notify customers about water quality issues, bottlers also don’t always carefully review their own test results.

In a 2011 case, an FDA inspector cited a Colorado bottler, Deep Rock Water Company, after a review of test results showed the company had produced water with 20 parts per billion of bromate—a possible human carcinogen—which is twice the legal limit. But an official at the company tasked with reviewing the tests “had not noticed the result was too high,” according to the FDA’s inspection, even though the test said “Fail” and “exceeds FDA limits for bromate.” (Deep Rock was purchased by DS Services of America, a bottling company, in late 2011.)

The FDA’s Turney said only that the firm “appeared” to have corrected the bromate contamination, though the agency did not collect any samples to test and confirm. No recall was conducted. Turney said the water had been distributed for sale to consumers. A spokesperson for DS Services said the company can’t comment on what happened as a result of inspections that occurred before it had acquired Deep Rock.

Full article below:

https://www.consumerreports.org/bottled-water/the-fda-knew-the-bottled-water-was-contaminated-the-public-didnt/

Suggestion: buy a distiller and distill your tap water. You’ll save money. Your water will be clean. Add the minerals back in yourself. A pinch of Himalayan pink salt will do.

Natural Bath Soak

Published December 7, 2019 by tindertender

Boiled Cedar, Wild Sage, and Lavender flower. I let it simmer for a time and then strained the product. I added the entire pot to my bath water (most likely a bit much) and slept more soundly than I have in awhile.

I will finish harvesting the cedar bows my father gifted me. Next summer I’ll harvest more Lavender flower and store with my Wild Sage specifically for the purpose of creating a soaking concoction for bathing.

I had no idea how good this would feel, or that is was even a thing. I was all about epsom salts, or sea salt, or magnesium flakes before. HA … these do not even come close in comparison as far as a relaxing bath additive.

Thank you Toni, wife to Chief Charlie, Blue Clan. I love you with all my heart! I am bringing you a jar of this juice and some Elderberry syrup also. I will be bringing the gifts I did not bring when I wasn’t able to make it to the elder party too, so whoever shows up is going to get some.

Love, love, love …. today feels like a good day to be happy. ❤️

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