Relative

All posts tagged Relative

The Big Man

Published November 22, 2022 by tindertender

“The Lakota, call Bigfoot Chiye-tanka “chiye” means “elder brother” and “tanka” means “great” or “big”. In English, though, the Lakota usually call him “the big man”.

“There is your Big man standing there, ever waiting, ever present, like the coming of a new day,” Oglala Lakota Medicine Man Pete Catches “He is both spirit and real being, but he can also glide through the forest, like a moose with big antlers, as though the trees weren’t there… I know him as my brother… I want him to touch me, just a touch, a blessing, something I could bring home to my sons and grandchildren, that I was there, that I approached him, and he touched me.” Ray Owen, son of a Dakota spiritual leader.

“They exist in another dimension from us, but can appear in this dimension whenever they have a reason to. See, it’s like there are many levels, many dimensions. When our time in this one is finished, we move on to the next, but the Big Man can go between. The Big Man comes from Creator. He’s our big brother, kind of looks out for us.

The existence of The Big Man is taken for granted throughout North America, and so are his powerful psychic abilities.The Big Man knows when humans are searching for him and that he chooses when and to whom to make an appearance, and that his psychic powers account for his ability to elude man’s efforts to capture him or hunt him down.

In Native culture, the entire natural world, the animals, the plants, the rivers, the stars is seen as a family.

The increasing appearances of the big man are not only a message or warning to the individuals or communities to whom he appears, but to humankind at large. A messenger who appears as a warning from Creator that man’s disrespect for his sacred instructions has upset the harmony and balance of existence!

Forest People

Published February 23, 2022 by tindertender

The forest people go by many names. Here is the more common name used among the Cherokee people, and the origin of the name.

Tsul ‘Kalu [pronounced Sool Kaloo] (the slant-eyed or sloping giant), is a legendary figure of Cherokee mythology who plays the role of “the great lord of the game”, and as such is frequently invoked in hunting rites and rituals.

The tale is one of the best known Cherokee legends and was recorded by Europeans as early as 1823, often using the spelling, Tuli cula. The name Tsul ‘Kalu means literally “he has them slanting/sloping”, being understood to refer to his eyes, although the word eye (akta, plural dikta) is not a part of it. In the plural form it is also the name of a traditional race of giants in the far west

He is said to dwell in a place called Tsunegun’yi. The words Tsul and Tsune and their variations appear in a number of Cherokee place names throughout the Southeastern United States, especially in western North Carolina and eastern Tennessee.

Tsul`kälû’ Tsunegûñ’yï is a 100-acre (40 ha) patch on a slope of the mountain Tanasee Bald in Jackson County, North Carolina, on the ridge upon which the boundari of Haywood, Jackson, and Transylvania Counties converge. It is believed Tsul ‘Kalu was responsible for clearing the spot for his residence. The name is sometimes corrupted by Europeans to Jutaculla; consequently the area is also known as the “Jutaculla Old Fields”. There is also a large slab of soapstone called “Jutaculla Rock” nearby, which is covered with strange scratches and carvings. These markings are said to have been made by the giant when he would jump from his home on the mountain to the creek below.

Another place associated with Tsul ‘Kalu, Tsula’sinun’yi (literally “where the footprint is”), is located on the Tuckasegee River, about a mile above Deep Creek in Swain County, North Carolina. Impressions said to have been the footprints of the giant Tsul`kälû’ and a deer were found on a rock which was destroyed during railroad building.

%d bloggers like this: